Give us a Call
252-364-2806
Opening Hours
Mon - Fri: 7AM - 6PM

Three Reasons Movement Matters

You don’t need Physical Therapy just for rehabilitation from injuries alone. Physical therapy also impacts people’s lives to help people move and live better!  That’s what people deserve right?

When it comes down to it, physical therapy is all about experiences. It’s about making it possible for people to live and experience life to the fullest. Movement – not just exercise, but the overall ability to work, play and LIVE WELL – just so happens to be at the center of so many of our greatest life experiences.”

And with October being National Physical Therapy Month, Jones and other physical therapists across the country are highlighting the many ways physical therapists are uniquely positioned to improve lives and experiences for people of all stages in life.

Physical therapists are highly educated medical professionals who are trained and licensed to help people both improve and maintain the ability to move optimally and with reduced pain. Often, physical therapists can help people do this without the need for surgery or prescription medication.

This includes people who are hurt, injured or who have had surgery, of course, but this also includes athletes looking to improve performance and avoid injury, older adults looking to remain active and independent, workers who want to improve production and comfort while on the job, women who are pregnant … all the way to people who simply just want to be healthier and less sedentary so they can better enjoy the things they love.

And, while strength, cardio health, balance and flexibility are critical for maintaining functional abilities throughout life (i.e., walking, climbing stairs, lifting, reaching, getting out of bed), the ability to move optimally and be active, is something that can equally benefit the body, the mind and the soul.

Why does movement matter?  Well here are some great ways that movement will help you:

Reduced pain – It’s no secret that being active and exercising regularly can benefit the body in seemingly countless ways, from improving cardiovascular health to reducing the incidence of chronic disease. But beyond maintaining great health, specific exercise as prescribed by a physical therapist can benefit people in numerous ways, from helping reduce chronic pain to strengthening bones and joints in older adults. Don’t get caught in the cycle of pain, then less movement, then more pain from not moving.

Improved focus and memory – Multiple studies have shown that regular exercise can sharpen and improve memory. But for those with mild cognitive impairments, exercise can also help slow the rate at which                people with such impairments decline. Exercise has also been linked to greater focus, improved learning for children and adolescents, and a reduction in anxiety and stress.

Overall Happiness – Research has also shown that those who exercise regularly tend to be happier and more social than those who live a more sedentary lifestyle. Not only that, but maintaining a stronger, healthier body with an eye toward optimal movement helps remove barriers that may stop someone from experiencing life to the fullest, whether that includes exploring new places or trying new things.

The best part about being a physical therapist is helping people get to a place in their lives that they thought was either in the past or was unattainable. Whether it’s helping a person complete their first 5K or making sure someone’s able to still pick up and hug their grandkids, our job as a PT is to help people experience life and be the greatest possible versions of themselves – all through better, more optimal movement.

Dr. Jones is a physical therapist, speaker, author and co-owner of Kinetic Physical Therapy & Wellness and Kinetic Pediatric Therapy who specializes and holds several credentials in orthopedics and manual therapy. He is a member of the American Physical Therapy Association, National Strength and Conditioning Association, and the American Academy of Orthopedic Manual Therapists.

What to Know about Chris Paul’s Hamstring Injury (and yours)

Everyone is going wild over the competition of the NBA Playoffs.  It’s nice to see some close games in the post season.  Can you even imagine the potential of the NBA finals without Lebron?

As much as we love the post season, it is often a common time for injury.  After all, players have played up to 82 games, not including practice, scrimmage, and workouts.  By the time of the postseason, those small regular season hiccups can build up to eventual injury.

Chris Paul was just officially pulled (no pun intended) from game 6 of the Warriors-Rockets Game due to a right hamstring strain.  The big questions is, will he return if there is a game 7?

Well, here’s what you should know about the hamstrings.  It is a huge muscle.  If you’re being fancy, the hamstrings actually consist of 3 muscles together (the semimembranosus, the semimembranosus, and the biceps femoris) It connects from your hip to your knee and is responsible for stabilizing the hip and the knee.

Without the hamstrings working at full capacity, the ability to bend the knee and extend the hip to stand tall (as when moving from a crouched or defensive position) becomes very difficult or painful.  The same movement is needed for sprinting as well, so you must to have them working to make that fast break on the court.

The big question is “how bad was the strain?” Hamstring strains can be grade 1, grade 2, or grade 3.

Grade 1 strains are mild and usually just a few muscle fibers have been damaged.  With a grade 1 strain the athlete can usually still bend their knee normally and typically are able to walk fine and maintain their normal power and endurance.  They might be sore the day after the injury still.

Grade 2 strains are moderate in nature and the athlete typically feels pain when the knee has to bend or the hip has to extend against any resistance. This usually makes sprinting pretty difficult.

Grade 3 strains are severe.  This means most of the muscle fibers are ruptured.  I don’t think Chris Paul has to worry about this. If he did, the announcement of the strain would have read, “Chris Paul Out For Remainder of Postseason”

So, what will happen in the short term to get him back on track?  Most likely his rehab team will explore the use of things like massage, ice and or heat, taping, dry needling, cupping, electrical stimulation (maybe a little prayer) to get him back on the court in the case of a game 7.  Don’t be surprised if you see him on a stationary bike courtside to keep his muscles warm when he returns.

Long term in the offseason, he will have to look at a rehab and prevention program that consists of eccentric muscle training (a muscle is holding a contraction while it lengthens) such as is done with Nordic Hamstrings Exercises.   Rehabilitating the entire lower extremity for coordination of his lower extremity muscle groups, balance, and agility will get him ready for the next season.

So, the big question is, can he return to play.  Well that just depends on how bad the strain was.  My bet is that considering the circumstances, his potential impact, and the fact that he was at least able to walk off the floor after the injury, they will figure out a way to get him back in the game.

Remember though, that is just for Chris Paul (you know, NBA star Chris Paul).  If you just suffered a hamstrings strain and a playoff series is not at risk, how about letting it rest just a little before getting back.

#kptwellness #livingwell #kptgreenville

 

Dr. Jones is a physical therapist, speaker, author and co-owner of Kinetic Physical Therapy & Wellness and Kinetic Pediatric Therapy who specializes and holds several credentials in orthopedics and manual therapy. He is a member of the American Physical Therapy Association, National Strength and Conditioning Association, and the American Academy of Orthopedic Manual Therapists.

A Better Way to Reduce Your Pain

October is National Physical Therapy Month, and as medical professionals across the U.S. work together to expound the benefits of physical therapy, the team at Kinetic Physical Therapy & Wellness in Greenville are joining the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) in highlighting a topic that affects the lives of millions: opioid awareness.

More specifically, the goal is to create awareness around the fact that physical therapy is a safe and effective alternative to opioids (i.e., Vicodin and OxyContin) for long-term pain management.

This is according to the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which in March of 2016 released guidelines urging non-opioid solutions (such as physical therapy) for the management of chronic pain.

There’s definitely a time and a place for the use of prescription pain medication, but the misuse of opioids in our country is very real. The CDC reports more than 1,000 people are treated in emergency rooms every day for misusing prescription opioids.

Other scary facts about opioids, according to the CDC:

  • Opioid misuse, overuse and addiction contributed to the death of nearly 20,000 Americans in 2014.
  • Health care providers wrote 259 million prescriptions for opioid pain medication in 2012, enough for every adult in the U.S.
  • As many as one in four people who receive prescription opioids long-term for non-cancer pain in primary care settings end up struggling with addiction.

It’s truly an epidemic in our country, but as a physical therapist I’m in a hopeful position to help people manage their chronic pain in ways that are safer and oftentimes more effective than using prescription drugs.

A number of studies over the years have pointed to movement, exercise and individualized physical therapy as effective options for treating chronic pain. A report about chronic pain released by the National Institutes of Health in January of 2015 specifically mentions physical therapy as a key, non-pharmaceutical option for treating, managing and event ending chronic pain.

“Despite what is commonly done in current clinical practice, there appear to be few data to support the long-term use of opioids for chronic pain management,” states the report titled “The Role of Opioids in the Treatment of Chronic Pain.”

“‘Movement is medicine,” is not a phrase we use lightly in the physical therapy profession, but the solution isn’t as easy as just suggesting movement and exercise. All who suffer from chronic pain are different, and through one-on-one care, we’re able to identify and address the physical as well as some of the mental and emotional factors that stand in the way of safe and effective pain care management.

From education, strength and flexibility exercises and manual therapy, to posture awareness, body mechanics instruction, and many other methods, physical therapists are licensed and trained to identify the causes of chronic pain, then establish individualized treatment plans for managing and possibly eliminating the pain.

Dr. Jones is a physical therapist, speaker, author and co-owner of Kinetic Physical Therapy & Wellness and Kinetic Pediatric Therapy who specializes and holds several credentials in orthopedics and manual therapy. He is a member of the American Physical Therapy Association, National Strength and Conditioning Association, and the American Academy of Orthopedic Manual Therapists.

3 Simple Steps to Prevent Golf Injuries

It’s estimated that about 29 million Americans each year hit the links for at least one round of golf. That’s 1 in 10 people in the U.S., according to the National Golf Foundation. But while golf is often considered a safe, low-impact, leisurely activity for people of all ages and abilities, that impression vastly underestimates the impact golf has on the body.

From sudden, acute injuries due to poor form or the lack of flexibility, to the development of long-term, overuse injuries caused by excessive play or poor swing mechanics, a round of golf can turn from leisurely to debilitating without proper training and conditioning.

People love to play golf because it’s challenging and competitive while, for the most part, remaining nondiscriminatory based on age or fitness level, but there’s no denying that golf as a sport is associated with a significant number of injuries each year – conditions that can keep you off the links while affecting other aspects of your life.

According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, more than 131,000 people were treated in hospital emergency rooms, doctors’ offices and other clinics for golf-related injuries in 2015 alone. The most common injuries affected golfers’ backs, shoulders and elbows.

The most common golf injuries tend to happen either when a golfer jumps into a season or round too quickly, before the body’s prepared for the rigors of 18 holes or they come from playing and practicing too much – without proper rest – which can lead to overuse injuries like back pain or golfer’s elbow.

Studies by the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) have shown that both are real issues within the golf community. For instance, AOSSM says that more than 80 percent of golfers spend less than 10 minutes warming up before a round. At the same time, about 44 percent of all reported golf injuries in youths are from overuse.

These injuries are preventable, and the first step is realizing that golf is truly a sport, not just a leisure activity. With any sport, you can’t just pick up the driver and start swinging. You have to get your body in shape for golf – both before the season and before a particular round – and you have to know when to rest.”

Preventing golf injuries requires the following:

Proper Mechanics: Your swing isn’t just important for accuracy and length. Proper mechanics keep you from placing too much strain on your back, elbows, shoulders … really your entire kinetic chain, from your feet to your head.

A Warmup Routine: If you’re one of the 80 percent of golfers who spend less than 10 minutes warming up, you’re just asking for injury. Instead, develop a regular and reliable stretching and warmup routine for use prior to each round that promotes flexibility, increases your heart rate, and gradually works your body up to swinging the driver.

Professional Advice: A golf pro can help you with mechanics, but a physical therapist can ensure your body is up for the rigors of performing these mechanics through nine or 18 holes. A full assessment from a physical therapist can help a golfer identify imbalances in strength and flexibility, from which a PT can provide him or her with a path toward addressing these deficiencies with an eye toward injury prevention and improving the golf game.

Dr. Jones is a physical therapist, speaker, author and co-owner of Kinetic Physical Therapy & Wellness and Kinetic Pediatric Therapy who specializes and holds several credentials in orthopedics and manual therapy. He is a member of the American Physical Therapy Association, National Strength and Conditioning Association, and the American Academy of Orthopedic Manual Therapists.

Another Way to Decrease Pain

Pain affects more Americans than diabetes, heart disease and cancer combined (American Academy of Pain Medicine).  If you are like most people, you probably want to get rid of it as quickly as possible.  Fortunately, there are many options out there for pain management that can be help without long term use of pain medications.

One of those options include Trigger Point Dry Needling.  Now I know you’re thinking, “a needle!  Oh my!”  No worries. It’s not quite what you think.  Dry needling is a treatment that has been safely provided by physical therapists since the 1920’s that has recently had a resurgence in use.  It involves a very thin monofilament type of needle that the physical therapist pushes through the skin to stimulate trigger points (really tight areas within the tissue) and muscles to help them to relax, to restore motion, and decrease pain.

Many athletes, runners, dancers, use dry needling as a part of their normal rehab routine.  Most people report that they don’t really feel anything with the initial stick until the needle gets into the muscle.  Then there is often a very quick muscle contraction that is more surprising than it is painful.  Afterwards, the client usually demonstrates improved range of motion and reports decreased pain.

After treatment, there might be a muscle soreness similar to what one would feel after exercise but once this is gone, oh the joy of decreased pain!

Now, remember, this is not magic (although it would be really cool if it were).  Dry needling is one of the many tools that physical therapists can use to help restore motion and decrease pain.  Your therapists can perform a thorough evaluation to help determine if you are a good candidate for this as a part of your treatment program to reduce your pain and improve your function.

Dr. Jones is a physical therapist, speaker, author and co-owner of Kinetic Physical Therapy & Wellness and Kinetic Pediatric Therapy who specializes and holds several credentials in orthopedics and manual therapy. He is a member of the American Physical Therapy Association, National Strength and Conditioning Association, and the American Academy of Orthopedic Manual Therapists.

What You Must Know About Pain and Soreness

There’s soreness, and then there’s pain. It’s important to not confuse the two.

To active people in general and athletes at all levels, the inability to recognize the differences between muscle soreness and pain can mean pushing your body – your muscles and joints – to the point of injury. It’s the difference, Jones says, between healthy progress and unnecessary, long-term risk.

Whether you’re a true athlete, are training for your first 5K fun run, enjoy riding your bike to work, or simply like working the soil in your garden, adopting the theory of ‘no pain, no gain’ isn’t always the wisest choice. It’s one thing if you get a little sore — this happens — but if you’re dealing with pain, you need to find out what’s causing the discomfort. Pushing through the pain could only cause long-term damage to your body.”

So how can you tell soreness from pain? The answer’s simple: listen to your body.

Here are some of the signs that you’re experiencing pain – not simply soreness — and should shut it down and seek the advice of a physician or physical therapist, according to both Jones and the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA):

Pain is Sharp: Sharp, intense pain that you experience when exercising and at rest can be classified as pain. In contrast, sore muscles tend to feel tight and achy when at rest. During exercise, sore muscles will feel “burning” and fatigued.

The burning feeling should be felt in the muscles, but, if the part of the body where you feel discomfort is swollen or warmer to the touch, that’s a sign of inflammation, which is beyond simple soreness.”

Pain in the Joints: Soreness is a muscular thing. Though muscle discomfort can also cross the line into pain, discomfort in the joints is less ambiguous.

If you feel in a particular joint or you’re struggling with activities that were previously easy, like getting up from a chair or walking up stairs, it’s time to seek professional advice.

Warm-Up Discomfort: If the discomfort you feel doesn’t go away after you’ve warmed up for your workout or event, you’ve potentially crossed the line into pain.

When you’re running, let’s say, and the second mile hurts the same as when you walked out the door that morning, you’re dealing with pain, not soreness.  General soreness – even a stiff joint – should improve through use.

R.I.C.E. Fails: If soreness persists and seems to linger, apply R.I.C.E., a popular acronym that takes you through the steps of Rest, Ice, Compression and Elevation. Then re-evaluate the way you feel. If the hurt doesn’t improve or subside, you may be dealing with pain. Time to seek the advice of an expert, such as a physical therapist.

The sooner you see a medical expert, such as a physical therapist, the less chance the potential injury will worsen,If you’re truly in pain, getting evaluated and treated immediately can improve and possibly hasten your recover, depending on the injury.

Dr. Jones is a physical therapist, speaker, author and co-owner of Kinetic Physical Therapy & Wellness and Kinetic Pediatric Therapy who specializes and holds several credentials in orthopedics and manual therapy. He is a member of the American Physical Therapy Association, National Strength and Conditioning Association, and the American Academy of Orthopedic Manual Therapists.

Take Steps to Avoid Sprained Ankles

With basketball season in full swing and winter weather affecting large areas of the country, it’s peak season for ankle sprains, one of the most common musculoskeletal injuries in the US, yet incidents of ankle sprains can be minimized through simple strength, balance and flexibility exercises.Read More

Dr. Jones is a physical therapist, speaker, author and co-owner of Kinetic Physical Therapy & Wellness and Kinetic Pediatric Therapy who specializes and holds several credentials in orthopedics and manual therapy. He is a member of the American Physical Therapy Association, National Strength and Conditioning Association, and the American Academy of Orthopedic Manual Therapists.

Aovid ‘Text Neck’ Injury with better smartphone posture

In so many ways, our smartphones make elements of our lives easier and more convenient, putting the world at our fingertips at a moment’s notice. But as we turn to our phones more often to connect, learn about the world, and simply occupy downtime, I must warn you that these technological tools have a downside.Read More

Dr. Jones is a physical therapist, speaker, author and co-owner of Kinetic Physical Therapy & Wellness and Kinetic Pediatric Therapy who specializes and holds several credentials in orthopedics and manual therapy. He is a member of the American Physical Therapy Association, National Strength and Conditioning Association, and the American Academy of Orthopedic Manual Therapists.

Get Rid of Those Tension Headaches for Good

Do you ever find that you have frequent headaches when you get stressed? Have you ever wondered why this happens? Tension headaches are typically the type of headaches that occur with stress. The pain from these headaches is frequently felt in the back and/or sides of the head, often spreading to the eye. Most people treat this type of pain with medication, but is this the best solution to address the underlying problem?

One of the most prevalent contributing factors to stress or tension headaches is Read More

Dr. Jones is a physical therapist, speaker, author and co-owner of Kinetic Physical Therapy & Wellness and Kinetic Pediatric Therapy who specializes and holds several credentials in orthopedics and manual therapy. He is a member of the American Physical Therapy Association, National Strength and Conditioning Association, and the American Academy of Orthopedic Manual Therapists.

Exercise Without Hurting Your Joints

“You need to exercise and lose 10lbs.”  This is often the dreaded feedback from medical practitioners to people who have pain in their joints.  Whether it is in the knees, hips, ankle, back or shoulder, none of us really want to exercise through pain.  If you think about it, this makes perfect sense anyway.

Read More

Dr. Jones is a physical therapist, speaker, author and co-owner of Kinetic Physical Therapy & Wellness and Kinetic Pediatric Therapy who specializes and holds several credentials in orthopedics and manual therapy. He is a member of the American Physical Therapy Association, National Strength and Conditioning Association, and the American Academy of Orthopedic Manual Therapists.